CHICAGO -- Manager John Farrell has an idea about his rotation setup after the All-Star break, beginning with Saturday's starter Ricky Romero.

Farrell said Romero would be followed by Aaron Laffey, Carlos Villanueva, Henderson Alvarez and Brett Cecil, respectively.

"That takes into account the additional four days of rest that every starter's going to get -- and probably build in a couple of more for Henderson, just given what he's come through in [his] first full year [in] the Major Leagues," Farrell said. "He's on a pace to throw 200 innings."

Starting the series out of the break with two southpaws against the Indians is part of Farrell's design.

"Cleveland is a predominantly left-handed-hitting lineup," Farrell said. "The series that follows that, you're just trying to map out the matchups that might be in our favor."

Adjustments in Minors paying off for Lind

CHICAGO -- Adam Lind credits his recent batting average jump and power surge to a few tweaks he made while spending more than a month at Triple-A Las Vegas before returning to the Blue Jays' lineup on June 25.

"Two or three weeks before I came back up, I was starting to feel more comfortable in the batter's box -- just a lot of hard work, a lot of experimenting and we kind of found a solution and kind of just ran with it," Lind said.

Lind, who hit .392 with eight homers and 29 RBIs in 32 games for Las Vegas after batting .186 before his demotion, said he found his rhythm at the plate by standing more upright and staying looser in the box to allow a freer motion with his leg kick.

He credited hitting coach Chad Mottola for helping him regain his stroke. Lind has raised his batting average to .209 and has four home runs in 11 games since his return.

Lind said it took a week at Triple-A to start driving the ball in batting practice, and another two weeks in games to get to the zone he's in at the plate. After tweaking his stance and working on drills, Lind finally found his rhythm.

"When I got down there, I just left the floor open to Chad Mottola and I said, 'Whatever you tell me to do, that's what I'm going to do,'" Lind said.

All-Star break coming at right time for Toronto

CHICAGO -- With two errors leading to a breakout fifth inning for the White Sox on Friday, manager John Farrell worries fatigue may be taking its toll on the Blue Jays.

The first error occurred on a throw by left fielder Rajai Davis that sailed over the head of catcher J.P Arencibia. The second came when third baseman Brett Lawrie attempted to flip the ball to Davis after an RBI single by Gordon Beckham into shallow left field.

Farrell said the Blue Jays lacked necessary fundamentals, from reading a line drive to making the right defensive decisions. He said when fatigue sets in, consistent focus and concentration can be difficult to maintain, which is costly in low-scoring games.

"Going back to the throw at home plate [on Friday], if that throw goes into second base, we're not in an infield-in situation -- where the bloop hit by Beckham compounds it," Farrell said. "The line drive after that, we're not playing the infield in again. That's where it starts to snowball a little bit, based on a play that might have happened three or four hitters prior."

Farrell said the Blue Jays are one of many teams who could use the All-Star break to get a breather, both physically and mentally.

"I think it's a good thing that baseball's gone to a uniform break," Farrell said. "Everyone feels like they've got the same rest period, particularly those teams that might be traveling coming out of the break."