TORONTO -- Right-hander Kyle Drabek will have an opportunity to finish his season on a positive note after the club announced he will be recalled from the Minors before Wednesday's game against the Red Sox.

Drabek began the year in Toronto, but he struggled with his control and composure on the mound. He went just 5-4 with a 5.70 ERA in 14 starts before being demoted to Triple-A in the middle of June.

The 23-year-old finished the Triple-A season with the Las Vegas 51s on Monday night and will now join the Blue Jays' bullpen as an option to pitch in long relief.

"There's work that continues to be done, particularly with refining his delivery, controlling his adrenaline while on the mound, commanding his fastball a little more consistently," manager John Farrell said.

"All of those things are still a work in progress but [we] feel like in shorter stints, rather than thinking about getting through a lineup three different times, and getting further Major League experience going into the offseason, there are a lot of positives that can come out of this."

Drabek struggled to find success in the hitter-friendly Pacific Coast League in Triple-A. Toronto wanted its top pitching prospect to stop relying too much on a cut fastball, and that pitch was temporarily removed from his repertoire.

The Texas native didn't respond to the change and the new environment very well. He managed to go just 5-4 with a 7.44 ERA in 15 starts while walking 41 batters over 75 innings.

But Blue Jays general manager Alex Anthopoulos believes those numbers are deceiving. Anthopoulos traveled to Las Vegas on Saturday and watched Drabek's final start. The stats from the game didn't look impressive, but Drabek's performance on the mound caught the GM's attention.

"I was really encouraged by what I saw," Anthopoulos said of Drabek, who allowed five runs over six innings. "I sent John Farrell an e-mail during the game. That's how excited I was. If I was sitting in the office and looking at the line, I'd say, 'Oh he's getting hit again.'

"The fastball was up to 96, he averaged 94-95, the curveball, he's now throwing for a strike, which he never had the ability to do here."

Anthopoulos said most of the damage occurred during one inning. It also provided another test for the former first-round pick because Toronto had previously been concerned about a lack of composure when things started to unravel on the mound.

Drabek handled the situation well, which is another step in the right direction for his overall development.

"There was one inning where he gave up the four to five runs, bloopers, bleeders, we kicked the ball behind him, there was a lot of weak hit balls, broken bats," Anthopoulos said. "The inning kind of snowballed on him, and I was really watching to see how he was going to react.

"He was composed, calm. It's going to come for him. I don't know if it's now, I don't know if it's going to be next year, but I think one way or the other, Kyle Drabek is going to be very, very good."

Toronto to add six Minor Leaguers to roster

TORONTO -- The Blue Jays will put the finishing touches on their September roster when six players are officially promoted to the Major Leagues prior to Wednesday night's game against Boston.

Right-handers Kyle Drabek, Chad Beck and Danny Farquhar and left-hander Brad Mills will join the pitching staff, while first baseman David Cooper and outfielder Adam Loewen round out the callups.

"Given the situation with our current bullpen, we've got some guys that are banged up. We'll make no bones about it," manager John Farrell said. "There are some limitations on their physical availability, so we felt like in certain situations, we might need a couple of extra arms, and in a couple of cases, it's a reward for the year that they've had."

The four pitchers will throw out of the bullpen and have the capability of going multiple innings. That is expected to provide some much-needed depth for a young starting rotation and a relief corps that has right-handers Jon Rauch, Casey Janssen and Dustin McGowan being eased back in from various injuries.

Cooper and Loewen both enjoyed successful seasons for a strong offensive club in Triple-A Las Vegas.

The 24-year-old Cooper hit .364 with nine home runs and 96 RBIs in 120 games. He also played 13 games in Toronto this season and went 4-for-33 with one homer and five RBIs. Cooper will backup Adam Lind at first base and possibly see some time at designated hitter.

Loewen's arrival will mark another stepping stone in his remarkable comeback story. The 27-year-old was taken with the fourth overall selection in the 2002 First-Year Player Draft as a talented left-handed starter.

He pitched parts of three seasons in Baltimore, but a variety of injuries derailed his once promising career. He made the decision in 2008 to give up pitching and try to make it as a hitter.

The positive results started to come in 2011 after two long seasons in the low Minors. Loewen finished his season with Triple-A hitting .306 with 17 home runs and 85 RBIs in 134 games. He appeared at all three outfield positions and also at first base in another testament to his overall versatility.

"His swing is so much better than when we first signed him -- night and day," general manager Alex Anthopoulos said. "His approach, he can draw a walk, he's moving better in the outfield.

"It's a great success story for him to do what he did, and to get to this level, how many guys can actually do that? ... And not as a charity case, but as someone who earned it. He deserves it probably more than all of these guys."

Davis' season over due to left hamstring injury

TORONTO -- Blue Jays outfielder Rajai Davis will miss the remainder of the season with a left hamstring injury.

Davis tore his left hamstring while running to first base during a game against the Angels on Aug. 14. He was attempting to work his way back to the Majors until he suffered a setback in a rehab game for Class A Dunedin over the weekend.

"We have shut him down," manager John Farrell confirmed on Tuesday. "He was coming along well, DH'd, one game, got into center field, and on the second consecutive day, he felt the hamstring continue to be sore. As a result, we've shut him down for the year."

Davis completes his first season in Toronto with a .237 average and 29 RBIs in 95 games. He also stole a team-high 34 bases while being caught just 11 times.