TORONTO -- Troy Glaus is done for the season. The Blue Jays third baseman is scheduled to undergo surgery on his left foot early next week, and Toronto is hopeful that Glaus will be fully recovered by Spring Training 2008.

On Wednesday, Toronto general manager J.P. Ricciardi said that Glaus will have Dr. Phillip Kwong will perform a nerve decompression operation, which could take place as early as Monday in Los Angeles. Glaus has been battling plantar fasciitis in his left foot since the first week of the season, but the Jays are optimistic that the upcoming surgery can alleviate the issue before next year.

"He should be totally healthy and ready to go," Ricciardi said. "That seems to be our slogan this week."

Ricciardi said that Glaus met with Dr. Kwong in Anaheim during the Jays' series against the Angels on Aug. 23-26. During that meeting, the doctor froze a nerve in Glaus' foot to temporarily help reduce the discomfort. The procedure provided a brief remedy, which convinced Kwong that the upcoming operation could present a solution.

"We exhausted every possible way to treat this, and then when we got out to California, we sent him over to Dr. Kwong," Ricciardi said. "They said, 'If [freezing the nerve] really takes and you don't feel any pain, then you probably need surgery to decompress the nerve.' That's what they did, and he felt better with it.

"After that wore off, he still felt the pain, so the surgery will take place. The surgery, we weren't really aware of until we were in Anaheim and they said, 'This is an option.'"

Ricciardi added that Glaus, who is under contract for $12.75 million in 2008, should be back on his feet and ready to begin his offseason training roughly a month after the procedure. This season, the 31-year-old third baseman has hit .262 with 20 home runs and 62 RBIs in 115 games for Toronto -- a year after he led the club with 38 homers and drove in 104 runs.

Glaus missed 14 games while on the disabled list with the injury in April, and he's missed games at various points throughout the season due to the ailment. In the second inning against the Tigers on Monday, Glaus exited the game after re-injuring the foot.

Ricciardi said that the latest flare-up was the result of adhesions -- caused by the plantar fasciitis -- breaking off in his foot. The source of Glaus' injury is near the heel and on the bottom of his foot, according to Ricciardi, who said Dr. Kwong will also inspect the arch in the foot as a precaution.

"I feel bad for the guy, because it started in Spring Training," Ricciardi said. "He just couldn't have a healthy season. So, it's a relief in the sense that we know what it is and we can take care of it and he can be healthy for Spring Training."

On Wednesday, Glaus wasn't available for questions about his upcoming surgery or in regard to the recent allegations against him.

A report on SI.com on Friday indicated that Glaus received multiple shipments of nandrolone -- an anabolic steroid -- and testerone at a California address from 2003-04, when he was with the Angels. Anonymous sources told SI.com reporters that the supplements came from a Florida pharmacy and were processed through a California anti-aging clinic.

Ricciardi said that he discussed the situation with Glaus, and Toronto's GM indicated that the third baseman's explanation for the report was adequate.

"That conversation was really private between him and I," Ricciardi said. "I'm not going to really share anything with you guys, but I felt like what he told me is fine. It's not my place to pass judgment. We just wanted to let him know that we're here for him and we support him. He's a Blue Jay, and we're not going to turn our back on him because of allegations."