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Delgado hits two homers in Derby
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07/14/2003 11:11 PM ET 
Delgado hits two homers in Derby
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CHICAGO -- Toronto Blue Jays slugger Carlos Delgado would have been better off if they'd put a couple of runners on base on Monday night.

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Delgado, who leads the American League in home runs and leads the Major Leagues with 97 RBIs, managed two home runs in 12 swings during the Home Run Derby at All-Star Game festivities at U.S. Cellular Field.

"I don't like to make any excuses," Delgado said. "I'm just glad I had a good time tonight, and it was fun."

Eschewing the familiar blue cap and swinging with his shaved head glistening in front of 47,619 fans, Delgado went homerless on his first seven swings. The first one was a fly ball down the left-field line, then all of the other hits -- homers and non-homers -- went to the right side.

Anaheim's Garret Anderson won in the finals over St. Louis' Albert Pujols.

Delgado's first homer was a towering shot that just cleared the wall in right-center. His other homer was a deeper shot to right-center. Three of the non-homers were singles that would have plated a runner in scoring position.

In actual play, Delgado has almost as many solo homers (13) as homers with runners on base (15). But it's clear he is more comfortable with runners on base (.370) than not (.272). Maybe opponents can use a different strategy: placing a group of youngsters in the outfield to shag balls.

"What you've been working on your whole life is take what they give you, drive the ball, stay through it and drive the ball to the opposite field," Delgado said. "But now it's just pull, lift and separate, and if you don't have it, you don't have it."

Thomas Harding is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.



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